Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Journal of Spectroscopy
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 459032, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/459032
Research Article

Super-Resolution Raman Spectroscopy by Digital Image Processing

1School of Science and Technology, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki 214-8571, Japan
2Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 8 Ichibancho, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-8472, Japan

Received 5 October 2012; Revised 6 January 2013; Accepted 1 February 2013

Academic Editor: Kong-Thon Tsen

Copyright © 2013 Motohiro Tomita et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

We demonstrate the results of a strain (stress) evaluation obtained from Raman spectroscopy measurements with the super-resolution method (the so-called super-resolution Raman spectroscopy) for a Si substrate with a patterned SiN film (serving as a strained Si sample). To improve the spatial resolution of Raman spectroscopy, we used the super-resolution method and a high-numerical-aperture immersion lens. Additionally, we estimated the spatial resolution by an edge force model (EFM) calculation. One- and two-dimensional stress distributions in the Si substrate with the patterned SiN film were obtained by super-resolution Raman spectroscopy. The results from both super-resolution Raman spectroscopy and the EFM calculation were compared and were found to correlate well. The best spatial resolution, 70 nm, was achieved by super-resolution Raman measurements with an oil immersion lens. We conclude that super-resolution Raman spectroscopy is a useful method for evaluating stress in miniaturized state-of-the-art transistors, and we believe that the super-resolution method will soon be a requisite technique.