Table of Contents
Journal of Signal Transduction
Volume 2011, Article ID 541851, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/541851
Research Article

Individual Rac GTPases Mediate Aspects of Prostate Cancer Cell and Bone Marrow Endothelial Cell Interactions

1The Laboratory for Cytoskeletal Physiology, Department of Biological Science, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA
2The Center for Translational Cancer Research, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA
3Biology Department, Lincoln University, Chester County, PA 19352, USA
4The Delaware Biotechnology Institute, University of Delaware, 320 Wolf Hall, Newark, DE 19716, USA

Received 1 November 2010; Revised 21 February 2011; Accepted 13 April 2011

Academic Editor: Adrienne D. Cox

Copyright © 2011 Moumita Chatterjee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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