Table of Contents
Journal of Signal Transduction
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 125295, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/125295
Review Article

Regulation of Adherens Junction Dynamics by Phosphorylation Switches

1Mechanobiology Institute Singapore, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117411
2Department of Bioengineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119077

Received 5 March 2012; Revised 21 May 2012; Accepted 22 May 2012

Academic Editor: Donna Webb

Copyright © 2012 Cristina Bertocchi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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