Table of Contents
Journal of Signal Transduction
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 483796, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/483796
Review Article

Involvement of Src in the Adaptation of Cancer Cells under Microenvironmental Stresses

1Laboratory of Cell Signaling and Development, Department of Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kyoto 603-8555, Japan
2Laboratory of Gene Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Dhaka, Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh

Received 24 February 2012; Revised 16 May 2012; Accepted 4 June 2012

Academic Editor: Yasuo Fukami

Copyright © 2012 A. K. M. Mahbub Hasan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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