Table of Contents
Journal of Signal Transduction
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 597214, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/597214
Research Article

Levels of C a V 1.2 L-Type C a 2 + Channels Peak in the First Two Weeks in Rat Hippocampus Whereas C a V 1.3 Channels Steadily Increase through Development

1Department of Biological Sciences, Marquette University, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI 53201, USA
2Department of Cell Biology, Neurobiology & Anatomy, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA
3Creighton University School of Medicine, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178, USA

Received 20 April 2012; Accepted 4 June 2012

Academic Editor: Jesus Garcia

Copyright © 2012 Audra A. Kramer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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