Table of Contents
Journal of Signal Transduction
Volume 2012, Article ID 735135, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/735135
Review Article

Nucleic Acids in Human Glioma Treatment: Innovative Approaches and Recent Results

1Istituto per l’Endocrinologia e l’Oncologia Sperimentale del CNR “G. Salvatore”, Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples, Italy
2Dipartimento di Biologia e Patologia Cellulare e Molecolare, University of Naples “Federico II”, Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples, Italy

Received 10 January 2012; Accepted 29 February 2012

Academic Editor: Juan-Carlos Martinez Montero

Copyright © 2012 S. Catuogno et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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