Table of Contents
Journal of Signal Transduction
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 791963, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/791963
Review Article

Neurospora crassa Light Signal Transduction Is Affected by ROS

A. N. Bach Institute of Biochemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 33 Leninsky Prospekt, Moscow 119071, Russia

Received 17 May 2011; Accepted 23 June 2011

Academic Editor: Alexey M. Belkin

Copyright © 2012 Tatiana A. Belozerskaya et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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