Table of Contents
Journal of Signal Transduction
Volume 2012, Article ID 807682, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/807682
Review Article

Molecular Crosstalk between Integrins and Cadherins: Do Reactive Oxygen Species Set the Talk?

1Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Torino, 10043 Orbassano, Italy
2Department of Biotechnology, University of Siena, 53100 Siena, Italy

Received 19 July 2011; Accepted 24 August 2011

Academic Editor: Alexey M. Belkin

Copyright © 2012 Luca Goitre et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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