Journal of Signal Transduction

Reactive Oxygen Species: Friends and Foes of Signal Transduction


Publishing date
15 Jan 2012
Status
Published
Submission deadline
15 Jul 2011

1Molecular Biotechnology Centre, Department of Genetics, Biology and Biochemistry, University of Torino, Torino, Italy

2Department of Biochemical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, Italy

3Department of Molecular Biology, University of Siena, 53100 Siena, Italy

4Department of Experimental and Diagnostic Medicine, Section of General Pathology, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara, Italy

5Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Center for Vascular and Inflammatory Diseases, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA


Reactive Oxygen Species: Friends and Foes of Signal Transduction

Description

The maintenance of highly regulated mechanisms to control intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is essential for normal cellular homeostasis. Indeed, most ROS, including free radicals and peroxides, are produced at low level by normal aerobic metabolism and play an important role in the redox-dependent regulation of many signaling processes. In contrast, excessive accumulation of ROS, resulting from an imbalance between ROS production and scavenging, leads to a condition of oxidative stress that can cause extensive oxidative damage to most cellular components, including proteins, lipids, and DNA, and may have pathophysiological consequences. Remarkably, oxidative stress has been clearly implicated in aging and the pathogenesis of several human diseases, including cardiovascular, metabolic, inflammatory, and neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Thus, ROS may function as friends or foes of signal transduction depending on specific threshold levels and cell context.

We invite investigators to submit original research articles as well as review articles that seek to define the involvement of ROS in physiological and pathological signal transduction processes. In particular, we would like to stimulate the continuing efforts to characterize regulatory molecules and mechanisms underlying the maintenance of intracellular redox homeostasis and the physiological and pathological roles of ROS in signal transduction pathways involving cell adhesion and growth factor receptor functions as well as to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the contribution of ROS to aging and the pathogenesis of human diseases. We are also interested in articles describing novel methodological approaches used to study ROS physiological and pathological functions, as well as the development of new therapeutic strategies based on redox regulation of signal transduction processes. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Maintenance of cellular redox homeostasis
  • ROS as signaling molecules
  • Crosstalk between ROS and small GTPases
  • ROS as regulators of cell adhesion and growth factor receptor signaling
  • Deadly liaisons: ROS and mitochondria in the control of cell death
  • ROS as key regulators of aging
  • ROS and vascular diseases
  • Role of ROS in cancer progression
  • Novel approaches in the study of ROS functions
  • Recent advances in antioxidant therapies

Before submission authors should carefully read over the journal's Author Guidelines, which are located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jst/guidelines.html. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript through the journal Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/ according to the following timetable:


Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 534029
  • - Editorial

Reactive Oxygen Species: Friends and Foes of Signal Transduction

Saverio Francesco Retta | Paola Chiarugi | ... | Alexey M. Belkin
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 684592
  • - Research Article

Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress due to Complex I Dysfunction Promotes Fibroblast Activation and Melanoma Cell Invasiveness

Maria Letizia Taddei | Elisa Giannoni | ... | Paola Chiarugi
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 754964
  • - Research Article

Redox Regulation of Nonmuscle Myosin Heavy Chain during Integrin Engagement

Tania Fiaschi | Giacomo Cozzi | Paola Chiarugi
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 807682
  • - Review Article

Molecular Crosstalk between Integrins and Cadherins: Do Reactive Oxygen Species Set the Talk?

Luca Goitre | Barbara Pergolizzi | ... | Saverio Francesco Retta
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 982794
  • - Review Article

Reactive Oxygen Species in Skeletal Muscle Signaling

Elena Barbieri | Piero Sestili
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 365769
  • - Review Article

The Interplay between ROS and Ras GTPases: Physiological and Pathological Implications

Elisa Ferro | Luca Goitre | ... | Lorenza Trabalzini
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 329635
  • - Review Article

Mitochondria-Ros Crosstalk in the Control of Cell Death and Aging

Saverio Marchi | Carlotta Giorgi | ... | Paolo Pinton
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 791963
  • - Review Article

Neurospora crassa Light Signal Transduction Is Affected by ROS

Tatiana A. Belozerskaya | Natalia N. Gessler | ... | Yulia I. Deryabina
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 208650
  • - Review Article

Nuclear Transport: A Switch for the Oxidative Stress—Signaling Circuit?

Mohamed Kodiha | Ursula Stochaj
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 101465
  • - Review Article

Oxidative Stress Induced by MnSOD-p53 Interaction: Pro- or Anti-Tumorigenic?

Delira Robbins | Yunfeng Zhao