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Journal of Toxicology
Volume 2009, Article ID 307618, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/307618
Research Article

Developmental and Reproductive Effects of SE5-OH: An Equol-Rich Soy-Based Ingredient

1Burdock Group, Orlando, FL 32801, USA
2The Safety Assessment Division II, Mitsubishi Chemical Safety Institute Ltd., Tokyo 105-0014, Japan
3The Department of Toxicology, Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., Tokushima 771-0192, Japan
4The Saga Nutraceuticals Research Institute, Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., Tokushima 771-0192, Japan

Received 29 May 2008; Revised 7 August 2008; Accepted 7 October 2008

Academic Editor: Robert Tanguay

Copyright © 2009 Ray A. Matulka et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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