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Journal of Toxicology
Volume 2009, Article ID 530279, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/530279
Research Article

Molecular and Biochemical Effects of a Kola Nut Extract on Androgen Receptor-Mediated Pathways

1Department of Environmental Toxicology, Southern University and A&M College, P.O. Box 9264, 108 Fisher Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70813, USA
2Department of Chemistry, Southern University and A&M College, P.O. Box 9716, 116 Lee Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70813, USA

Received 9 March 2008; Accepted 5 June 2008

Academic Editor: Margaret James

Copyright © 2009 Rajasree Solipuram et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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