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Journal of Toxicology
Volume 2011, Article ID 391074, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/391074
Research Article

The Loss of HIF1 Leads to Increased Susceptibility to Cadmium-Chloride-Induced Toxicity in Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts

1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1319, USA
2Center for Mitochondrial Sciences and Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA
3Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA

Received 5 January 2011; Revised 13 April 2011; Accepted 5 May 2011

Academic Editor: Jack Ng

Copyright © 2011 Ajith Vengellur et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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