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Journal of Toxicology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 392859, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/392859
Research Article

24-Epibrassinolide, a Phytosterol from the Brassinosteroid Family, Protects Dopaminergic Cells against MPP+-Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis

1Department of Biochemistry, Neurosciences Research Group, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières, QC, Canada G9A 5H7
2Neuroscience Research Unit, Centre de recherche, Université Laval, Ste-Foy, QC, Canada G1V 4G2

Received 15 December 2010; Revised 7 March 2011; Accepted 28 March 2011

Academic Editor: William Valentine

Copyright © 2011 Julie Carange et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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