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Journal of Toxicology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 595307, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/595307
Review Article

Nutritional Manipulation of One-Carbon Metabolism: Effects on Arsenic Methylation and Toxicity

1Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 722 West 168th Street, Room T31, New York, NY 10032, USA
2Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 722 West 168th Street, Room 1107E, New York, NY 10032, USA

Received 15 June 2011; Revised 20 December 2011; Accepted 21 December 2011

Academic Editor: Tanja Schwerdtle

Copyright © 2012 Megan N. Hall and Mary V. Gamble. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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