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Journal of Toxicology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 802453, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/802453
Research Article

Toxicologic Assessment of a Commercial Decolorized Whole Leaf Aloe Vera Juice, Lily of the Desert Filtered Whole Leaf Juice with Aloesorb

1LSU School of Veterinary Medicine, Skip Bertman Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA
2Comparative Biomedical Sciences Department, LSU School of Veterinary Medicine, Skip Bertman Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA
3Science, Technology and Toxicology (ST&T) Consultants, 655 Montgomery Street, Suite 800, San Francisco, CA 94111, USA
4Division of Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine (BIOMMED), LSU School of Veterinary Medicine, Skip Bertman Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA
5Lily of the Desert, 1887 Geesling Road, Denton, TX 76208, USA

Received 6 December 2012; Accepted 30 January 2013

Academic Editor: Steven J. Bursian

Copyright © 2013 Inder Sehgal et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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