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Journal of Toxicology
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 2169212, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2169212
Research Article

The Hypoactivity Associated with the Repeated Exposure to Atrazine Is Related to Decreases in the Specific Binding to D1-DA Receptors in the Striatum of Rats

1Departamento de Neurobiología Conductual y Cognitiva, Instituto de Neurobiología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, 76230 Querétaro, QRO, Mexico
2Departamento de Neurobiología Molecular y Celular, Instituto de Neurobiología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, 76230 Querétaro, QRO, Mexico

Correspondence should be addressed to Verónica M. Rodríguez; moc.oohay@erimrev

Received 16 May 2017; Revised 17 October 2017; Accepted 1 November 2017; Published 6 December 2017

Academic Editor: Orish Ebere Orisakwe

Copyright © 2017 José Abraham Márquez-Ramos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The herbicide atrazine (ATR) has a potential toxic effect on the neuronal circuits of the brain, specifically on two major dopaminergic pathways: the nigrostriatal and mesolimbic circuits. In this work, we repeatedly exposed adult male Sprague-Dawley rats to 6 injections of 100 mg ATR/kg of body weight (for two weeks) and one saline injection two days after ATR administration. Locomotor activity was assessed for 15 minutes and/or 2 hours after ATR or saline injection and 2 months after the final ATR administration. The specific binding of [3H]-SCH23390 to D1-DA receptors and that of [3H]-Spiperone to D2-DA receptors in the dorsal and ventral striatum were assessed 2 days and 2 months after ATR treatment. ATR administration resulted in immediate, short- and long-term hypoactivity and reduced specific binding of [3H]-SCH23390 in the dorsal striatum of rats evaluated 2 months after the last ATR injection. The specific binding of [3H]-SCH23390 in the ventral striatum and the specific binding of [3H]-Spiperone in the dorsal and ventral striatum remained unchanged at 2 days or 2 months after ATR treatment. These results, together with previous findings of our group, indicate that the nigrostriatal system is a preferential target for ATR exposure.