Journal of Toxicology

Toxicity of Organometal(loids)


Publishing date
15 Nov 2011
Status
Published
Submission deadline
15 May 2011

Lead Editor

1University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany

2Visva-Bharati University, India

3Vanderbilt University Medical Center, USA

4The University of Münster, 48149 Münster, Germany


Toxicity of Organometal(loids)

Description

Biomethylation of metals and metalloids is a well-known process ubiquitously occurring in the environment, which leads to the formation of chemical species with significantly higher mobility and altered toxicity. The transfer of methyl groups is established not only under anaerobic conditions, but also within aerobic milieus and has been described in natural systems for arsenic, cadmium, germanium, mercury, sulfur, antimony, selenium, tin, tellurium, and lead as well as for bismuth, gold, chromium, palladium, platinum, and thallium under laboratory conditions. Abundant literature is available to describe analysis, genesis, and environmental distribution of organometal(loids) in the environment. Thus, it became widely known that these compounds exhibit particular physicochemical properties like volatility (e.g., peralkylated species) or amphiphilicity (e.g., partly alkylated species) leading to increased mobility within the ecosphere as well as inside organisms (e.g., membrane diffusion), and therefore attracting the attention of environmentalists and toxicologists. Although it has been widely recognized that the toxic potential of organometal(loid) compounds may be comparable or even higher than that of inorganic species of the respective elements (e.g., arsenic or mercury), relevant data for the evaluation of the health impact of many environmental organometal(loids) are still scarce (e.g., bismuth, selenium, and tellurium). In this respect, it has also to be considered that humans are not only exposed to these compounds from the environment via inhalation and ingestion, but may also be able to generate these species by endogenous enzymes or/and biomethylation in the colon.

To investigate the toxicity of organometal(loid) compounds, it is crucial to combine the toxicological testing with analytical methods because organometal(loids) can be biomethylated intracellularly and thus can affect human health. This special issue is aimed at meeting these requirements and getting more information about the toxicological behaviour of many so far unknown organometal(loid) species. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Toxicity of compounds containing at least one metal(loid)-carbon bond. Although the most important members of this group may be alkylated (especially methylated) species, also others like carbonyls will be welcomed
  • Elements just emerging like antimony, bismuth, or tellurium in addition to often discussed ones like arsenic, mercury, tin, and lead
  • Data concerning acutely toxic, geno- and neurotoxic effects observed in cellular and animal experiments
  • Processes of metabolic alkylation and dealkylation in humans and animals
  • Epidemiological studies which are linked to analytical measurements of arsenic species in urine or blood
  • Mechanistic studies regarding cellular pathways of metal(loid) toxicity

Before submission authors should carefully read over the journal's Author Guidelines, which are located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jt/guidelines/. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript through the journal Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/ according to the following timetable:


Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 358484
  • - Editorial

Toxicity of Organometal(loids)

Elke Dopp | Shelley Bhattacharya | ... | Tanja Schwerdtle
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 595307
  • - Review Article

Nutritional Manipulation of One-Carbon Metabolism: Effects on Arsenic Methylation and Toxicity

Megan N. Hall | Mary V. Gamble
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 395482
  • - Research Article

Caspase-10 Is the Key Initiator Caspase Involved in Tributyltin-Mediated Apoptosis in Human Immune Cells

Harald F. Krug
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 373141
  • - Research Article

Toxicological Characterization of the Inorganic and Organic Arsenic Metabolite Thio-DMAV in Cultured Human Lung Cells

Marc Bartel | Franziska Ebert | ... | Tanja Schwerdtle
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 491039
  • - Research Article

Production of Toxic Volatile Trimethylbismuth by the Intestinal Microbiota of Mice

Britta Huber | Philip Dammann | ... | Reinhard Hensel
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 503576
  • - Research Article

Toxicity of Volatile Methylated Species of Bismuth, Arsenic, Tin, and Mercury in Mammalian Cells In Vitro

E. Dopp | U. von Recklinghausen | ... | A. V. Hirner
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 608349
  • - Research Article

Toxicity of Methylated Bismuth Compounds Produced by Intestinal Microorganisms to Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a Member of the Physiological Intestinal Microbiota

Beatrix Bialek | Roland A. Diaz-Bone | ... | Reinhard Hensel
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 721987
  • - Review Article

Biochemical Factors Modulating Cellular Neurotoxicity of Methylmercury

Parvinder Kaur | Michael Aschner | Tore Syversen
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 686050
  • - Review Article

Lead-Binding Proteins: A Review

Harvey C. Gonick
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 895236
  • - Review Article

Revelations from the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans on the Complex Interplay of Metal Toxicological Mechanisms

Ebany J. Martinez-Finley | Michael Aschner
Journal of Toxicology
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate35%
Submission to final decision113 days
Acceptance to publication61 days
CiteScore2.170
Impact Factor-
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