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Journal of Tropical Medicine
Volume 2011, Article ID 628435, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/628435
Review Article

Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 and Haemozoin: Wedding Rings for Human Host and Plasmodium falciparum Parasite in Complicated Malaria

Dipartimento di Genetica, Biologia e Biochimica, Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia, Università di Torino, Via Santena 5 bis, 10126 Torino, Italy

Received 31 December 2010; Accepted 7 March 2011

Academic Editor: Sasithon Pukrittayakamee

Copyright © 2011 Mauro Prato and Giuliana Giribaldi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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