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Journal of Tropical Medicine
Volume 2011, Article ID 891342, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/891342
Review Article

Low- and High-Tech Approaches to Control Plasmodium Parasite Transmission by Anopheles Mosquitoes

W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA

Received 3 April 2011; Accepted 8 June 2011

Academic Editor: Thomas R. Unnasch

Copyright © 2011 Chris M. Cirimotich et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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