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Journal of Tropical Medicine
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 923943, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/923943
Review Article

Human Polymorphisms as Clinical Predictors in Leprosy

Pharmaceutical and Medical Biotechnology Unit, Research Center in Technology and Design Assistance of Jalisco State, National Council of Science and Technology, 44270 Guadalajara, JAL, Mexico

Received 16 August 2011; Revised 11 October 2011; Accepted 20 October 2011

Academic Editor: Marcelo Távora Mira

Copyright © 2011 Ernesto Prado Montes de Oca. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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