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Journal of Tropical Medicine
Volume 2012, Article ID 184819, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/184819
Research Article

Investigation of Association between Susceptibility to Leprosy and SNPs inside and near the BCHE Gene of Butyrylcholinesterase

1Department of Genetics, Federal University of Paraná, P.O. Box 19071, 81531-980 Curitiba, PR, Brazil
2Core for Advanced Molecular Investigation, Medical School, Pontifical Catholic University of Paraná, Imaculada Conceição, 1155, 80215-901 Curitiba, PR, Brazil

Received 31 May 2011; Revised 16 October 2011; Accepted 13 December 2011

Academic Editor: Ib Christian Bygbjerg

Copyright © 2012 Henrique J. P. Gomes et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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