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Journal of Tropical Medicine
Volume 2019, Article ID 4151536, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/4151536
Research Article

Long Term School Based Deworming against Soil-Transmitted Helminths Also Benefits the Untreated Adult Population: Results from a Community-Wide Cross Sectional Survey

1Eastern and Southern Africa Center for International Parasite Control (ESACIPAC), Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI), Kenya
2School of Health Sciences, Meru University of Science and Technology, Meru, Kenya
3Center for Biotechnology Research and Development (CBRD), Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI), Kenya
4Center for Microbiology Research (CMR), Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI), Kenya

Correspondence should be addressed to Paul M. Gichuki; moc.liamg@ikuhcigmluap

Received 17 January 2019; Revised 8 March 2019; Accepted 17 March 2019; Published 2 May 2019

Academic Editor: Marcel Tanner

Copyright © 2019 Paul M. Gichuki et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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