Table of Contents
Journal of Toxins
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 167492, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/167492
Research Article

Cytotoxiciy of Naja nubiae (Serpentes: Elapidae) and Echis ocellatus (Serpentes: Viperidae) Venoms from Sudan

1Faculty of Science, University of Khartoum, P.O. Box 321, Khartoum, Sudan
2Department of Immunology, Institute of Endemic Diseases, University of Khartoum, P.O. Box 11463, Khartoum, Sudan
3Monash Venom Group, Department of Pharmacology, Monash University, VIC 3800, Australia

Received 25 December 2014; Revised 1 March 2015; Accepted 2 March 2015

Academic Editor: A. M. Soares

Copyright © 2015 Huda Khalid et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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