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Journal of Thyroid Research
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 142413, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/142413
Research Article

Transient Non-Autoimmune Hyperthyroidism of Early Pregnancy

Department of Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA

Received 22 March 2011; Revised 4 May 2011; Accepted 4 May 2011

Academic Editor: Roberto Negro

Copyright © 2011 Alexander M. Goldman and Jorge H. Mestman. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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