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Journal of Thyroid Research
Volume 2011, Article ID 306367, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/306367
Review Article

Thyroid Functions and Bipolar Affective Disorder

Department of Psychiatry, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh 160012, India

Received 15 January 2011; Revised 23 April 2011; Accepted 29 May 2011

Academic Editor: Guillermo Juvenal

Copyright © 2011 Subho Chakrabarti. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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