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Journal of Thyroid Research
Volume 2011, Article ID 306510, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/306510
Review Article

The Central Effects of Thyroid Hormones on Appetite

Section of Investigative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, 6th Floor, Commonwealth Building, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London W12 0NN, UK

Received 21 December 2010; Accepted 31 March 2011

Academic Editor: Carmen C. Solorzano

Copyright © 2011 Anjali Amin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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