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Journal of Thyroid Research
Volume 2011, Article ID 402320, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/402320
Review Article

Thyroid Hormone Receptors in Two Model Species for Vertebrate Embryonic Development: Chicken and Zebrafish

1Division Animal Physiology and Neurobiology, Biology Department, Laboratory of Comparative Endocrinology, K.U.Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
2Department of Agricultural Sciences, Centre for Agribiosciences, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC 3086, Australia

Received 24 February 2011; Accepted 1 April 2011

Academic Editor: Michelina Plateroti

Copyright © 2011 Veerle M. Darras et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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