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Journal of Thyroid Research
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 730630, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/730630
Review Article

Looking for the Mechanism of Action of Thyroid Hormone

Division of Developmental Biology, The National Institute for Medical Research, The Ridgeway, Mill Hill, London NW7 2HA, UK

Received 8 February 2011; Accepted 29 March 2011

Academic Editor: Laurent Sachs

Copyright © 2011 Jamshed R. Tata. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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