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Journal of Thyroid Research
Volume 2013, Article ID 424163, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/424163
Research Article

Combined Treatment with Myo-Inositol and Selenium Ensures Euthyroidism in Subclinical Hypothyroidism Patients with Autoimmune Thyroiditis

1University of Rome “Sapienza”, Institute of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Viale del Policlinico, 00155 Rome, Italy
2Ars Medica spa, Via Ferrero di Cambiano Cesare 29, 00191 Rome, Italy

Received 8 May 2013; Revised 27 August 2013; Accepted 27 August 2013

Academic Editor: Jack R. Wall

Copyright © 2013 Maurizio Nordio and Raffaella Pajalich. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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