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Journal of Thyroid Research
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 8765049, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8765049
Review Article

Prenatal Exposures to Multiple Thyroid Hormone Disruptors: Effects on Glucose and Lipid Metabolism

1School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Herston, QLD 4029, Australia
2UQ Centre for Clinical Research, The University of Queensland, Herston, QLD 4029, Australia
3Conjoint Endocrine Laboratory, Chemical Pathology, Pathology Queensland, Queensland Health, Herston, QLD 4029, Australia
4School of Biomedical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4001, Australia

Received 27 October 2015; Revised 8 January 2016; Accepted 12 January 2016

Academic Editor: Noriyuki Koibuchi

Copyright © 2016 Deborah Molehin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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