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Journal of Transplantation
Volume 2015, Article ID 329615, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/329615
Research Article

Psychosocial Status of Liver Transplant Candidates in Iran and Its Correlation with Health-Related Quality of Life and Depression and Anxiety

1Psychosomatic Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 1419733141, Iran
2Liver Transplantation Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 1419733141, Iran
3Nephrology Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 1419733141, Iran
4Psychiatry and Psychology Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 1333715914, Iran
5Department of Psychiatry, Psychosomatic Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 1419733141, Iran

Received 24 July 2015; Accepted 14 September 2015

Academic Editor: Patrizia Burra

Copyright © 2015 Maryam Banihashemi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objectives. The study was aimed at providing a psychosocial profile for Iranian liver transplant candidates referred to an established liver transplantation program. Material and Methods. Patients assessed for liver transplant candidacy in Imam Khomeini Hospital (Tehran, Iran) between March 2013 and September 2014 were included. The following battery of tests were administered: Psychosocial Assessment of Candidates for Transplant (PACT), the Short-Form health survey (SF-36), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Results. Psychosocial assessment in 205 liver transplant candidates revealed significant impairments in several SF-36 domains; social functioning was the least and physical functioning was the most impaired domains. The prevalence of cases with probable anxiety and depressive disorders, according to HADS, was 13.8% and 5.6%, respectively. According to PACT, 24.3% of the assessed individuals were considered good or excellent candidates. In 11.2%, transplantation seemed poor candidate due to at least one major psychosocial or lifestyle risk factor. Poor candidate quality was associated with impaired health-related quality of life and higher scores on anxiety and depression scales (). Conclusions. Transplant programs could implement specific intervention programs based on normative databases to address the psychosocial issues in patients in order to improve patient care, quality of life, and transplant outcomes.