Table of Contents
Journal of Vaccines
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 586356, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/586356
Research Article

Obstetrical Healthcare Personnel's Attitudes and Perceptions on Maternal Vaccination with Tetanus-Diphtheria-Acellular Pertussis and Influenza

1Division of Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, University of Florida, 1600 SW Archer Road, P.O. Box 100296, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
2Division of Obstetrics and Maternal Fetal Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA
3Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA 90502, USA

Received 4 February 2013; Accepted 2 April 2013

Academic Editor: Sherri L. LaVela

Copyright © 2013 Vini Vijayan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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