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Journal of Veterinary Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 610654, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/610654
Research Article

Whole Body Computed Tomography with Advanced Imaging Techniques: A Research Tool for Measuring Body Composition in Dogs

1School of Environmental and Rural Science, Department of Animal Science, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
2NSW Department of Primary Industries, Beef Industry Centre, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
3North Hill Vet Clinic, Armidale, NSW 2350, Australia

Received 6 May 2013; Revised 14 September 2013; Accepted 17 September 2013

Academic Editor: Juan G. Chediack

Copyright © 2013 Dharma Purushothaman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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