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Journal of Veterinary Medicine
Volume 2018, Article ID 1018230, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1018230
Review Article

Diagnosis and Treatment of Lower Motor Neuron Disease in Australian Dogs and Cats

1University of Queensland School of Veterinary Science, Gatton, QLD 4350, Australia
2Veterinary Specialist Service, Underwood, QLD 4127, Australia

Correspondence should be addressed to A. M. Herndon; ua.ude.qu@nodnreh.a

Received 11 April 2018; Accepted 24 July 2018; Published 6 August 2018

Academic Editor: William Alberto Cañón-Franco

Copyright © 2018 A. M. Herndon et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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