Table of Contents Author Guidelines
Journal of Veterinary Medicine
Volume 2019, Article ID 1307582, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/1307582
Research Article

Gastrointestinal Helminth Parasites of Chicken under Different Management System in Mekelle Town, Tigray Region, Ethiopia

1Veterinary Drug and Feed Administration and Control Authority, P.O. Box 1776, Mekelle, Ethiopia
2Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Hawassa University, P.O. Box 05, Hawassa, Ethiopia
3College of Veterinary Medicine, Mekelle University, P.O. Box 2084, Mekelle, Ethiopia

Correspondence should be addressed to Mebrahtu Berhe; moc.liamg@99ybem

Received 15 October 2018; Revised 13 January 2019; Accepted 29 January 2019; Published 11 February 2019

Academic Editor: Antonio Ortega-Pacheco

Copyright © 2019 Mebrahtu Berhe et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The poultry industry is an infant but fast growing sector in Ethiopia. However, it is largely dependent on local chicken managed under backyard production system. The sector is facing different challenges, mainly emanated from prevalence of infectious diseases such as helminth parasite species. Hence, this study came up with an aim to determine the infection rate and identify helminth parasite species in chickens managed under different production systems, in Mekelle, Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study design was employed, from November 2015 to March 2016. Postmortem (N=138) and fecal (N=410) samples of chicken were considered for necropsy and coproscopic examination to see both adult and eggs of helminth parasites, respectively. Similar gastrointestinal helminth parasites infection rate of chicken was obtained from both examination approaches (necropsy, 90.60%; and coproscopy, 90.97%). The study attested high prevalence (87.7%) of mixed infection with helminth parasites of chicken. Heterakis gallinarum (72.5%) and Ascaridia galli (68.8%) were found as the most dominant species (necropsy). During coproscopic examination cestode (89%) infections showed a relatively higher prevalence than nematodes (84.4%), although no difference was observed during that of necropsy examination results. Chickens of local breed from backyard production system had shown more likelihood of getting helminth infection when compared with their corresponding relatives (coproscopy). However, the variation was not statistically significant during that of necropsy finding. Therefore, the higher prevalence of parasitism and mixed infection observed in the study area would warrant for an urgent intervention with regular deworming scheme, and strict attention should be given towards hygienic measures and other health related management activities.