Table of Contents
Leukemia Research and Treatment
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 603830, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/603830
Review Article

MicroRNAs in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Blood Disorders

1New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ 08731, USA
2Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, New Jersey Medical School, MSB C512, Newark, NJ 07103, USA

Received 6 March 2012; Accepted 17 April 2012

Academic Editor: Michael Danilenko

Copyright © 2012 Yao Yuan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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