SRX Materials Science

SRX Materials Science / 2010 / Article

Research Article | Open Access

Volume 2010 |Article ID 152526 | https://doi.org/10.3814/2010/152526

Shinji Ochi, "Tensile Properties of Kenaf Fiber Bundle", SRX Materials Science, vol. 2010, Article ID 152526, 6 pages, 2010. https://doi.org/10.3814/2010/152526

Tensile Properties of Kenaf Fiber Bundle

Received22 Jul 2009
Revised08 Sep 2009
Accepted22 Sep 2009
Published22 Nov 2009

Abstract

Tensile tests of kenaf fiber with different characteristics were carried out and their potential application to the reinforcement of FRP was conducted. Specifically, the effect of stem diameter and length on the mechanical properties of kenaf fiber of different types was investigated. In addition, after converting kenaf fibers into pulp, the cellulose content ratios and extent of polymerization within the fibers were measured to investigate their influence on the tensile strength of the fibers. The tensile strength of kenaf fiber was observed to increase with the length of the stem. Moreover, at approximately 48%, the ratio of cellulose contained in kenaf fiber was found to be stable regardless of the length and diameter of the kenaf stem. Cellulose DP in kenaf fibers was observed to change depending on the tensile strength of the fiber and longer kenaf fibers were found to have relatively higher tensile strengths and cellulose DP.

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Copyright © 2010 Shinji Ochi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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