Table of Contents
Metal-Based Drugs
Volume 2008 (2008), Article ID 289490, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/289490
Research Article

Identification of Proteins Related to Nickel Homeostasis in Helicobater pylori by Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography and Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis

1Institute of Life and Health Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, China
2Department of Chemistry and Open Laboratory of Chemical Biology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
3Department of Anatomy, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Received 28 June 2007; Accepted 21 October 2007

Academic Editor: Edward N. Baker

Copyright © 2008 Xuesong Sun et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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