Table of Contents
Molecular Biology International
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 343961, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/343961
Review Article

Evasion of Host Defence by Leishmania donovani: Subversion of Signaling Pathways

Infectious Diseases and Immunology Division, Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, 4, Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032, India

Received 31 December 2010; Accepted 25 February 2011

Academic Editor: Hemanta K. Majumder

Copyright © 2011 Md. Shadab and Nahid Ali. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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