Table of Contents
Molecular Biology International
Volume 2011, Article ID 532106, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/532106
Review Article

A Perspective on the Emergence of Sialic Acids as Potent Determinants Affecting Leishmania Biology

1Infectious Diseases and Immunology Division, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, 4 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032, India
2Department of Zoology, Triveni Devi Bhalotia College, Raniganj, Burdwan 713347, India

Received 30 November 2010; Revised 19 January 2011; Accepted 12 May 2011

Academic Editor: Kwang Poo Chang

Copyright © 2011 Angana Ghoshal and Chitra Mandal. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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