Table of Contents
Molecular Biology International
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 718974, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/718974
Review Article

Arsenic Biotransformation as a Cancer Promoting Factor by Inducing DNA Damage and Disruption of Repair Mechanisms

1Department of Integrative Oncology, BC Cancer Research Centre, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, Canada V5Z 1L3
2Biomedical Sciences Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Independencia 1027, 8380453 Santiago, Chile

Received 16 March 2011; Accepted 6 June 2011

Academic Editor: Frédéric Coin

Copyright © 2011 Victor D. Martinez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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