Table of Contents
Molecular Biology International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 141732, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/141732
Review Article

RASSF Signalling and DNA Damage: Monitoring the Integrity of the Genome?

Department of Oncology, The Gray Institute, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ, UK

Received 3 November 2011; Accepted 27 January 2012

Academic Editor: Geoffrey J. Clark

Copyright © 2012 Simon F. Scrace and Eric O'Neill. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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