Table of Contents
Molecular Biology International
Volume 2012, Article ID 974924, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/974924
Review Article

APOBEC3 versus Retroviruses, Immunity versus Invasion: Clash of the Titans

1Department of Biology, College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA 01610, USA
2Department of Biology, Clark University, 950 Main Street Worcester, MA 01610, USA

Received 26 January 2012; Accepted 1 April 2012

Academic Editor: Abraham Brass

Copyright © 2012 Ann M. Sheehy and Julie Erthal. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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