Table of Contents
Molecular Biology International
Volume 2013, Article ID 189237, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/189237
Research Article

Investigation of the Association between Genetic Polymorphism of Microsomal Epoxide Hydrolase and Primary Brain Tumor Incidence

1Department of Molecular Biology, Science and Art Faculty, Gaziosmanpasa University, 60150 Tokat, Turkey
2Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Cumhuriyet University, 58100 Sivas, Turkey
3Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, Cumhuriyet University, 58100 Sivas, Turkey

Received 14 August 2013; Revised 11 November 2013; Accepted 12 November 2013

Academic Editor: Mouldy Sioud

Copyright © 2013 Ali Aydin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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