Table of Contents
Molecular Biology International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 686984, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/686984
Review Article

mTOR Signaling in Protein Translation Regulation: Implications in Cancer Genesis and Therapeutic Interventions

Department of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, University of Kashmir, Science Block, Ground Floor, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir 190006, India

Received 22 August 2014; Accepted 6 October 2014; Published 20 November 2014

Academic Editor: Malayannan B. Subramaniam

Copyright © 2014 Mehvish Showkat et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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