Table of Contents
Molecular Biology International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 4328697, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4328697
Review Article

Role of B Cell Development Marker CD10 in Cancer Progression and Prognosis

1Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005, India
2Department of Zoology, Mahila Mahavidyalaya, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005, India

Received 29 July 2016; Revised 7 October 2016; Accepted 17 October 2016

Academic Editor: Sharad S. Singhal

Copyright © 2016 Deepshikha Mishra et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. E. G. Erdos and R. A. Skidgel, “Neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (enkephalinase) and related regulators of peptide hormones,” FASEB Journal, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 145–151, 1989. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. M. Sumitomo, R. Shen, and D. M. Nanus, “Involvement of neutral endopeptidase in neoplastic progression,” Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA)—Proteins and Proteomics, vol. 1751, no. 1, pp. 52–59, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  3. N. D. Bland, J. W. Pinney, J. E. Thomas, A. J. Turner, and R. E. Isaac, “Bioinformatic analysis of the neprilysin (M13) family of peptidases reveals complex evolutionary and functional relationships,” BMC Evolutionary Biology, vol. 8, article 16, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  4. M. F. Greaves, G. Brown, N. T. Rapson, and T. A. Lister, “Antisera to acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells,” Clinical Immunology and Immunopathology, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 67–84, 1975. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. J. Ritz, J. M. Pesando, J. Notis-McConarty, H. Lazarus, and S. F. Schlossman, “A monoclonal antibody to human acute lymphoblastic leukaemia antigen,” Nature, vol. 283, no. 5747, pp. 583–585, 1980. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. M. A. Shipp, G. E. Tarr, C.-Y. Chen et al., “CD10/neutral endopeptidase 24.11 hydrolyzes bombesin-like peptides and regulates the growth of small cell carcinomas of the lung,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 88, no. 23, pp. 10662–10666, 1991. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. M. A. Shipp and A. T. Look, “Hematopoietic differentiation antigens that are membrane-associated enzymes: cutting is the key!,” Blood, vol. 82, no. 4, pp. 1052–1070, 1993. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. C. Oefner, A. D'Arcy, M. Hennig, F. K. Winkler, and G. E. Dale, “Structure of human neutral endopeptidase (neprilysin) complexed with phosphoramidon,” Journal of Molecular Biology, vol. 296, no. 2, pp. 341–349, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. C. Marie-Claire, G. Tiraboschi, E. Ruffet, N. Inguimbert, M.-C. Fournie-Zaluski, and B. P. Roques, “Exploration of the S'1 subsite of neprilysin: a joined molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis study,” Proteins: Structure, Function and Genetics, vol. 39, no. 4, pp. 365–371, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. M. C. Béné, “Immunophenotyping of acute leukaemias,” Immunology Letters, vol. 98, no. 1, pp. 9–21, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  11. K. Imai, H. Kanzaki, H. Fujiwara et al., “Expression of aminopeptidase N and neutral endopeptidase on the endometrial stromal cells in endometriosis and adenomyosis,” Human Reproduction, vol. 7, no. 9, pp. 1326–1328, 1992. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. S. L. Loke, C. Y. Leung, K. Y. Chiu, W. L. Yau, K. N. Cheung, and L. Ma, “Localisation of CD10 to biliary canaliculi by immunoelectron microscopical examination,” Journal of Clinical Pathology, vol. 43, no. 8, pp. 654–656, 1990. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  13. Y. Sato, F. Itoh, Y. Hinoda et al., “Expression of CD10/neutral endopeptidase in normal and malignant tissues of the human stomach and colon,” Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 12–17, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. A. M. Vale and H. W. Schroeder Jr., “Clinical consequences of defects in B-cell development,” Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 125, no. 4, pp. 778–787, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  15. M. E. Hystad, J. H. Myklebust, T. H. Bø et al., “Characterization of early stages of human B cell development by gene expression profiling,” Journal of Immunology, vol. 182, no. 9, p. 5882, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. M. Ichii, K. Oritani, T. Yokota et al., “The density of CD10 corresponds to commitment and progression in the human B lymphoid lineage,” PLoS ONE, vol. 5, no. 9, Article ID e12954, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  17. E. Sanz, N. Muñoz-A, J. Monserrat et al., “Ordering human CD34+CD10CD19+ pre/pro-B-cell and CD19 common lymphoid progenitor stages in two pro-B-cell development pathways,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 107, no. 13, pp. 5925–5930, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. J. M. Pesando, J. Ritz, and H. Lazarus, “Leukemia-associated antigens in ALL,” Blood, vol. 54, no. 6, pp. 1240–1248, 1979. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. M. J. Borowitz, M. Devidas, S. P. Hunger et al., “Clinical significance of minimal residual disease in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and its relationship to other prognostic factors: A Children's Oncology Group Study,” Blood, vol. 111, no. 12, pp. 5477–5485, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. F. E. Craig and K. A. Foon, “Flow cytometric immunophenotyping for hematologic neoplasms,” Blood, vol. 111, no. 8, pp. 3941–3967, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  21. B. L. Wood, M. Arroz, D. Barnett et al., “2006 Bethesda International Consensus recommendations on the immunophenotypic analysis of hematolymphoid neoplasia by flow cytometry: optimal reagents and reporting for the flow cytometric diagnosis of hematopoietic neoplasia,” Cytometry Part B-Clinical Cytometry, vol. 72, supplement 1, pp. S14–S22, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. K. Leithner, C. Wohlkoenig, E. Stacher et al., “Hypoxia increases membrane metallo-endopeptidase expression in a novel lung cancer ex vivo model—role of tumor stroma cells,” BMC Cancer, vol. 14, no. 1, article 40, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. I. A. Voutsadakis, P. J. Vlachostergios, D. D. Daliani et al., “CD10 is inversely associated with nuclear factor-kappa B and predicts biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy,” Urologia Internationalis, vol. 88, no. 2, pp. 158–164, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. T. Fukusumi, H. Ishii, M. Konno et al., “CD10 as a novel marker of therapeutic resistance and cancer stem cells in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma,” British Journal of Cancer, vol. 111, no. 3, pp. 506–514, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. T. J. Jang, J. B. Park, and J. I. Lee, “The expression of CD10 and CD15 is progressively increased during colorectal cancer development,” Korean Journal of Pathology, vol. 47, no. 4, pp. 340–347, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  26. R. Del Sordo, S. Ascani, G. Bellezza, I. Ferri, M. Sbaraglia, and A. Sidoni, “CD10 is frequently expressed in classical seminomas,” Histology and Histopathology, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 101–106, 2014. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. S. H. Jana, B. M. Jha, C. Patel, D. Jana, and A. Agarwal, “CD10-A new prognostic stromal marker in breast carcinoma, its utility, limitations and role in breast cancer pathogenesis,” Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology, vol. 57, no. 4, pp. 530–536, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. T. Sasaki, H. Kuniyasu, Y. Luo et al., “Serum CD10 is associated with liver metastasis in colorectal cancer,” Journal of Surgical Research, vol. 192, no. 2, pp. 390–394, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. K.-W. Lee, C. O. Sung, J. H. Kim et al., “CD10 expression is enhanced by Twist1 and associated with poor prognosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with facilitating tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo,” International Journal of Cancer, vol. 136, no. 2, pp. 310–321, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. A. Ahuja, N. Gupta, N. Kalra, R. Srinivasan, Y. Chawla, and A. Rajwanshi, “Role of CD10 immunochemistry in differentiating hepatocellular carcinoma from metastatic carcinoma of the liver,” Cytopathology, vol. 19, no. 4, pp. 229–235, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. N. Borscheri, A. Roessner, and C. Röcken, “Canalicular immunostaining of neprilysin (CD10) as a diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinomas,” American Journal of Surgical Pathology, vol. 25, no. 10, pp. 1297–1303, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. J. Wagoner, C. Keehn, and M. B. Morgan, “CD-10 immunostaining differentiates superficial basal cell carcinoma from cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma,” American Journal of Dermatopathology, vol. 29, no. 6, pp. 555–558, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. M. A. Dall'Era, L. D. True, A. F. Siegel, M. P. Porter, T. M. Sherertz, and A. Y. Liu, “Differential expression of CD10 in prostate cancer and its clinical implication,” BMC Urology, vol. 7, article 3, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  34. M. Erhuma, M. Köbel, T. Mustafa et al., “Expression of neutral endopeptidase (NEP/CD10) on pancreatic tumor cell lines, pancreatitis and pancreatic tumor tissues,” International Journal of Cancer, vol. 120, no. 11, pp. 2393–2400, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. N. A. Makretsov, M. Hayes, B. A. Carter, S. Dabiri, C. B. Gilks, and D. G. Huntsman, “Stromal CD10 expression in invasive breast carcinoma correlates with poor prognosis, estrogen receptor negativity, and high grade,” Modern Pathology, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 84–89, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. L. Deschamps, A. Handra-Luca, D. O'Toole et al., “CD10 expression in pancreatic endocrine tumors: correlation with prognostic factors and survival,” Human Pathology, vol. 37, no. 7, pp. 802–808, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. Y. Fujimoto, Y. Nakanishi, S. Sekine et al., “CD10 expression in colorectal carcinoma correlates with liver metastasis,” Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, vol. 48, no. 10, pp. 1883–1889, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. R. Murali and W. Delprado, “CD10 immunohistochemical staining in urothelial neoplasms,” American Journal of Clinical Pathology, vol. 124, no. 3, pp. 371–379, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. T. Iwase, R. Kushima, K.-I. Mukaisho, S. Mitsufuji, T. Okanoue, and T. Hattori, “Overexpression of CD10 and reduced MUC2 expression correlate with the development and progression of colorectal neoplasms,” Pathology Research and Practice, vol. 201, no. 2, pp. 83–91, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. W. B. Huang, X. J. Zhou, J. Y. Chen et al., “CD10-positive stromal cells in gastric carcinoma: correlation with invasion and metastasis,” Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 35, no. 5, pp. 245–250, 2005. View at Google Scholar
  41. G. M. Tse, A. K. Tsang, T. C. Putti et al., “Stromal CD10 expression in mammary fibroadenomas and phyllodes tumours,” Journal of Clinical Pathology, vol. 58, no. 2, pp. 185–189, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  42. N. A. Makretsov, M. Hayes, B. A. Carter, S. Dabiri, C. B. Gilks, and D. G. Huntsman, “Stromal CD10 expression in invasive breast carcinoma correlates with poor prognosis, estrogen receptor negativity, and high grade,” Modern Pathology, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 84–89, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. K. Iwaya, H. Ogawa, M. Izumi, M. Kuroda, and K. Mukai, “Stromal expression of CD10 in invasive breast carcinoma: a new predictor of clinical outcome,” Virchows Archiv, vol. 440, no. 6, pp. 589–593, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. N. Bilalovic, B. Sandstad, R. Golouh, J. M. Nesland, I. Selak, and E. E. Torlakovic, “CD10 protein expression in tumor and stromal cells of malignant melanoma is associated with tumor progression,” Modern Pathology, vol. 17, no. 10, pp. 1251–1258, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. J. Kanitakis, D. Narvaez, and A. Claudy, “Differential expression of the CD10 antigen (neutral endopeptidase) in primary versus metastatic malignant melanomas of the skin,” Melanoma Research, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 241–244, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. C. Tomoda, R. Kushima, E. Takeuti, K.-I. Mukaisho, T. Hattori, and H. Kitano, “CD10 expression is useful in the diagnosis of follicular carcinoma and follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma,” Thyroid, vol. 13, no. 3, pp. 291–295, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  47. M. Mokhtari and F. Ameri, “Diagnostic value of CD-10 marker in differentiating of papillary thyroid carcinoma from benign thyroid lesions,” Advanced Biomedical Research, vol. 3, article 206, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  48. C. N. Papandreou, B. Usmani, Y. Geng et al., “Neutral endopeptidase 24.11 loss in metastatic human prostate cancer contributes to androgen-independent progression,” Nature Medicine, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 50–57, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  49. S. J. Freedland, D. B. Seligson, A. Y. Liu et al., “Loss of CD10 (neutral endopeptidase) is a frequent and early event in human prostate cancer,” Prostate, vol. 55, no. 1, pp. 71–80, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  50. A. Fleischmann, C. Rocha, N. Saxer-Sekulic, I. Zlobec, G. Sauter, and G. N. Thalmann, “High CD10 expression in lymph node metastases from surgically treated prostate cancer independently predicts early death,” Virchows Archiv, vol. 458, no. 6, pp. 741–748, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  51. S. Thomas, R. J. Babu, K. Agarwal et al., “Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on stromal CD10 antigens in breast cancer—a preliminary study,” Indian Journal of Cancer, vol. 50, no. 1, pp. 46–51, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  52. M. Terauchi, H. Kajiyama, K. Shibata, K. Ino, S. Mizutani, and F. Kikkawa, “Anti-progressive effect of neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (NEP/CD10) on cervical carcinoma in vitro and in vivo,” Oncology, vol. 69, no. 1, pp. 52–62, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  53. H. Kajiyama, K. Shibata, M. Terauchi et al., “Neutral endopeptidase 24.11/CD10 suppresses progressive potential in ovarian carcinoma in vitro and in vivo,” Clinical Cancer Research, vol. 11, no. 5, pp. 1798–1808, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  54. M. Sumitomo, R. Shen, M. Walburg et al., “Neutral endopeptidase inhibits prostate cancer cell migration by blocking focal adhesion kinase signaling,” The Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 106, no. 11, pp. 1399–1407, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  55. A. Horiguchi, D. Y. T. Chen, O. B. Goodman et al., “Neutral endopeptidase inhibits prostate cancer tumorigenesis by reducing FGF-2-mediated angiogenesis,” Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 79–87, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  56. O. B. Goodman Jr., M. Febbraio, R. Simantov et al., “Neprilysin inhibits angiogenesis via proteolysis of fibroblast growth factor-2,” Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 281, no. 44, pp. 33597–33605, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  57. M. Sumitomo, A. Iwase, R. Zheng et al., “Synergy in tumor suppression by direct interaction of neutral endopeptidase with PTEN,” Cancer Cell, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 67–78, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  58. K. H. Taylor, J. Liu, J. Guo, J. W. Davis, H. Shi, and C. W. Caldwell, “Promoter DNA methylation of CD10 in lymphoid malignancies,” Leukemia, vol. 20, no. 10, pp. 1910–1912, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  59. I. Martin-Kleiner, I. Svoboda-Beusan, and J. Gabrilovac, “PMA and doxorubicin decrease viability, MTT activity and expression of CD10 marker on NALM-1 leukemic cells,” Immunopharmacology and Immunotoxicology, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 411–420, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  60. G. Gaipa, G. Basso, S. Aliprandi et al., “Prednisone induces immunophenotypic modulation of CD10 and CD34 in nonapoptotic B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells,” Cytometry Part B: Clinical Cytometry, vol. 74, no. 3, pp. 150–155, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  61. S. Thomas, R. J. Babu, K. Agarwal et al., “Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on stromal CD10 antigens in breast cancer—A Preliminary Study,” Indian Journal of Cancer, vol. 50, no. 1, pp. 46–51, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  62. D. Mishra, V. K. Singh, S. Singh, and G. Narayan, “Molecular modelling-docking cell surface receptor CD10 target for doxorubicin,” Online Journal of Bioinformatics, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 286–292, 2015. View at Google Scholar
  63. G. Yegen, M. A. Demir, Y. Ertan, O. A. Nalbant, and M. Tunçyürek, “Can CD10 be used as a diagnostic marker in thyroid pathology?” Virchows Archiv, vol. 454, no. 1, pp. 101–105, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  64. C. Langner, M. Ratschek, P. Rehak, L. Schips, and R. Zigeuner, “CD10 is a diagnostic and prognostic marker in renal malignancies,” Histopathology, vol. 45, no. 5, pp. 460–467, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  65. J. Ordi, C. Romagosa, F. A. Tavassoli et al., “CD10 expression in epithelial tissues and tumors of the gynecologic tract: a useful marker in the diagnosis of mesonephric, trophoblastic, and clear cell tumors,” The American Journal of Surgical Pathology, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 178–186, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  66. W. G. McCluggage, V. P. Sumathi, and P. Maxwell, “CD10 is a sensitive and diagnostically useful immunohistochemical marker of normal endometrial stroma and of endometrial stromal neoplasms,” Histopathology, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 273–278, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  67. K. Uehara, F. Ikehara, Y. Tanabe et al., “CD10 expression in the neuroendocrine carcinoma component of endometrial mixed carcinoma: association with long survival,” Diagnostic Pathology, vol. 11, article 16, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  68. R. K. Ganju, M. Sunday, D. G. Tsarwhas, A. Card, and M. A. Shipp, “CD10/NEP in non-small cell lung carcinomas: relationship to cellular proliferation,” Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 94, no. 5, pp. 1784–1791, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus