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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2006, Article ID 47297, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/MI/2006/47297
Research Communication

The Acute-Phase Proteins Serum Amyloid A and C Reactive Protein in Transudates and Exudates

1Departamento de Patologia, Análises Clínicas e Toxicológicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Paraná CEP 86051-990, Brazil
2Departamento de Análises Clínicas e Toxicológicas, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo CEP 05508-900, Brazil
3Núcleo de Investigações Químico-Farmacêuticas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade do Vale do Itajaí, Santa Catarina CEP 88302-202, Brazil
4Departamento de Fisioterapia, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Paraná CEP 86051-990, Brazil
5Hospital Universitário, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo CEP 05508-900, Brazil

Received 24 August 2005; Accepted 6 October 2005

Copyright © 2006 Alessandra M. Okino et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The distinction between exudates and transudates is very important in the patient management. Here we evaluate whether the acute-phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA), in comparison with C reactive protein (CRP) and total protein (TP), can be useful in this discrimination. CRP, SAA, and TP were determined in 36 exudate samples (27 pleural and 9 ascitic) and in 12 transudates (9 pleural and 3 ascitic). CRP, SAA, and TP were measured. SAA present in the exudate corresponded to 10% of the amount found in serum, that is, the exudate/serum ratio (E/S) was 0.10±0.13. For comparison, the exudate/serum ratio for CRP and TP was 0.39±0.37 and 0.68±0.15, respectively. There was a strong positive correlation between serum and exudate SAA concentration (r=0.764;p<0.0001). The concentration of SAA in transudates was low and did not overlap with that found in exudates (0.02-0.21 versus 0.8–360.5 g/mL). SAA in pleural and ascitic exudates results mainly from leakage of the serum protein via the inflamed membrane. A comparison of the E/S ratio of SAA and CRP points SAA as a very good marker in discriminating between exudates and transudates