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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2006, Article ID 47297, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/MI/2006/47297
Research Communication

The Acute-Phase Proteins Serum Amyloid A and C Reactive Protein in Transudates and Exudates

1Departamento de Patologia, Análises Clínicas e Toxicológicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Paraná CEP 86051-990, Brazil
2Departamento de Análises Clínicas e Toxicológicas, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo CEP 05508-900, Brazil
3Núcleo de Investigações Químico-Farmacêuticas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade do Vale do Itajaí, Santa Catarina CEP 88302-202, Brazil
4Departamento de Fisioterapia, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Paraná CEP 86051-990, Brazil
5Hospital Universitário, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo CEP 05508-900, Brazil

Received 24 August 2005; Accepted 6 October 2005

Copyright © 2006 Alessandra M. Okino et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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