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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2006 (2006), Article ID 54202, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/MI/2006/54202
Research Communication

Systemic and Local CC Chemokines Production in a Murine Model of Listeria monocytogenes Infection

1Department of Microbiology, Medical Faculty, University of Rijeka, Rijeka 51000, Croatia
2Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana 1000, Slovenia
3Department of Medical Informatics, Medical Faculty, University of Rijeka, Rijeka 51000, Croatia

Received 29 December 2005; Revised 17 February 2006; Accepted 19 February 2006

Copyright © 2006 Marina Bubonja et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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