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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2006 (2006), Article ID 93684, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/MI/2006/93684
Invited Review Article

Glutamate Receptors in Neuroinflammatory Demyelinating Disease

1Centre for Biochemical Pharmacology and Experimental Pathology, John Vane Science Centre, St Bartholomew's Hospital Medical School, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ, United Kingdom
2Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Frenchay Campus, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol BS16 1QY, United Kingdom

Received 20 September 2005; Accepted 10 November 2005

Copyright © 2006 Christopher Bolton and Carolyn Paul. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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